Fossil dating activity

From radioisotopes in rock layers to biological fossils, there are many clues scientists use to understand what happened on Earth and when.The activities on this page are designed to help students begin to understand the age of the earth.This activity on determining age of rocks and fossils is intended for 8th or 9th grade students.It is estimated to require four hours of class time, including approximately one hour total of occasional instruction and explanation from the teacher and two hours of group (team) and individual activities by the students, plus one hour of discussion among students within the working groups.Once students begin to grasp "relative" dating, they can extend their knowledge of geologic time by exploring radiometric dating and developing a timeline of Earth's history.­ ­As soon as a living organism dies, it stops taking in new carbon.Once they are able to manipulate the cards into the correct sequence, they are asked to do a similar sequencing activity using fossil pictures printed on "rock layer" cards.

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So that's where the team and I goto places with sedimentary rock.

These activities are designed for use with 5-8th graders.

There is an emphasis on inquiry and all activities are tied to the National Science Education Standards.

Explore this link for additional information on the topics covered in this lesson: This activity will help students to have a better understanding of the basic principles used to determine the age of rocks and fossils. Objectives of this activity are: 1) To have students determine relative age of a geologically complex area.

2) To familiarize students with the concept of half-life in radioactive decay.

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